Learn About Industrial Hemp

LEARN ABOUT
INDUSTRIAL HEMP

LEARN ABOUT
INDUSTRIAL HEMP

History of Hemp

Hemp is the oldest domesticated crop in the world and also the key to modern civilization

For more than ten thousand years, hemp, the first plant ever cultivated, has been central to the growth of civilization. As settled populations spread from Mesopotamian valley throughout Central Asia and beyond, this foundational plant went with them everywhere, its reputation secured in religious texts that refer to hemp as “sacred grass” or “king of seeds.” In its earliest cultivated form, the plant figured in medicine, religion, and practical pursuits in a time when there was not much difference between those three central activities of life. Explore hemp history to learn more.

History of Hemp

Hemp is the oldest domesticated crop in the world and also the key to modern civilization

For more than ten thousand years, hemp, the first plant ever cultivated, has been central to the growth of civilization. As settled populations spread from Mesopotamian valley throughout Central Asia and beyond, this foundational plant went with them everywhere, its reputation secured in religious texts that refer to hemp as “sacred grass” or “king of seeds.” In its earliest cultivated form, the plant figured in medicine, religion, and practical pursuits in a time when there was not much difference between those three central activities of life. Explore hemp history to learn more.

History of Hemp

What is Industrial Hemp?

Same Genus, Different Uses

industrial hemp with farmer and measurement-v2-01

Industrial Hemp

Trace Levels THC (0% - 0.3%)

Agricultural Commodity (USDA)

Carbon Sequestration

Industrial Use

Fiber - Stalk

Textiles

Soil Remediation

Pulp – Paper / Packaging

Energy – Methane / Ethanol

Grain - Seed

Energy – Biodiesel

Cosmetics

Hemp Seed Oil

Nutrition – Animal Feed / Protein

Hurd – High Cellulose Content

Construction – Concrete / Insulation

Bioplastics

Animal Bedding

Biocomposites

marijuana with leaves-01

Marijuana – Psychoactive

High Level THC (1%-35%)

Federally Controlled Substance (DEA)

Recreational / Clinical Use

hemp icon v3-01

Medical Hemp - CBD, CBG, etc.

Low Level THC (0.3% - 1%)

Federally Controlled Substance (FDA)

Therapeutic / Medicinal Use

What is Industrial Hemp?

Same Genus, Different Uses

industrial hemp with farmer and measurement-v2 mobile

Industrial Hemp

Trace Levels THC (0% - 0.3%)

Agricultural Commodity (USDA)

Carbon Sequestration

Industrial Use

Fiber - Stalk

Textiles

Soil Remediation

Pulp – Paper / Packaging

Energy – Methane / Ethanol

Grain - Seed

Energy – Biodiesel

Cosmetics

Hemp Seed Oil

Nutrition – Animal Feed / Protein

Hurd – High Cellulose Content

Construction – Concrete / Insulation

Bioplastics

Animal Bedding

Biocomposites

marijuana with leaves mobile

Marijuana – Psychoactive

High Level THC (1%-35%)

Federally Controlled Substance (DEA)

Recreational / Clinical Use

hemp icon v3 mobile

Medical Hemp - CBD, CBG, etc.

Low Level THC (0.3% - 1%)

Federally Controlled Substance (FDA)

Therapeutic / Medicinal Use

End Products

Hemp now plays a key role in a variety of consumer products, including dietary supplements and skin products. Its fiber has proven useful in making building materials, clothing, paper, and many other common products.

 

Hemp Materials for Housing
Housing

70% of the total weight of the hemp plant is made up of the “hurd” or woody inner core. This part of the plant is THC free. Engineers have discovered a number of properties of the hurd that make it valuable in housing construction.

Hemp is Nutritious Food
Food

Hemp grains or seed are often cultivated for food products. The seed can be eaten raw or cooked an can be pressed and packaged as oils or protein powders.

Hemp Oil and Seeds are Nutrition
Nutrition

Hemp provides a complete protein (all nine amino acids necessary for human nutrition), and the hempseed oils (rich in lanolin and linolenic acids) contain beneficial amounts of omega-3 and omega-6 fats—the good, unsaturated fats.

Hemp Fibers are strong and durable
Fiber

Until its rediscovery in the late 1980s, the use of hemp for fiber production had declined sharply. Recent reintroduction has shown that hemp fibers prove to be strong, durable and unaffected by water.

Hemp as Fuel
Fuel

The by-products of hemp cultivation can be processed into bio-diesel fuels, thanks to the oils in the seeds and stalk of the hemp.

End Products

Hemp now plays a key role in a variety of consumer products, including dietary supplements and skin products. Its fiber has proven useful in making building materials, clothing, paper, and many other common products.

Housing

70% of the Cannabis Plant total weight is made up of the 'hurd' or woody inner core. This part of the plant is THC free (i.e. Hemp) and is used in housing construction. The silica leached from the soil by the plant combined with lime forms a chemical bond like cement, which is fire and water proof.

Hemp Materials for Housing

Food

Hemp may be grown also for food from the hemp grain (seed).  The grain can be utilized raw or cooked or can be pressed for protein & oil.

Hemp is Nutritious Food

Nutrition

Both the complete protein and the oils contained in hemp seeds (rich in lanolin and linolenic acids) are in ideal ratios for human nutrition.

Hemp Oil and Seeds are Nutrition

Fiber

The main uses of hemp fiber were in rope, sacking, carpet, nets and webbing. A hemp clothing industry was reborn in the West in 1988, and hemp is being used in increasing quantities in paper manufacturing. The cellulose content is about 70%.

Hemp Fibers are strong and durable

Fuel

Fuel can be a by-product of hemp cultivation. One fuel can be biodiesel because of the oils in the seeds and stalk of the hemp, and another would be biofuel from the fibrous stalks.

Hemp as Fuel